LETTER: Trudeau needs to reconsider pipeline for good of Canada

A letter writer argues that risks to the environment far outweigh economic benefits.

Dear Prime Minister Trudeau

March 24th of this year marked the 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, which spewed 11 million gallons (40 million liters) of crude oil into Alaska’s Prince William Sound.

Exxon Valdez oil spill clean-up costs exceeded $7 billion (according to the International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation Limited). One million gallons (almost 4 million liters) of crude oil polluted roughly 1,300 miles (over 2,000 km) of shore line.

Despite application of the most advanced technology available, only approximately 8% of the oil was recovered. There is still over 100 tonnes of oil remaining in the area.

To date the spill caused more than $300 million of economic harm to more than 32,000 people whose livelihoods depended on commercial and recreational fishing and tourism. Two years following the spill, the economic losses to recreational fishing were estimated to be $31 million.

The death toll of wildlife is estimated at hundreds of thousands seabirds, sea and river otters, harbor seals, and bald eagles; population of killer whales that swam through the affected parts of the Prince William Sound suffered losses of 40 percent in the year after this disaster (22 Orcas died immediately after the spill), plus billions of salmon and herring eggs were destroyed according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

In 1991, Exxon reached a civil settlement with the U.S. government and the state of Alaska in which it agreed to pay over $5 billion in various payments (where the biggest chunk of the money were punitive damages) however after many years of appeals the punitive damages were reduced from $5 billion to $2.5 billion and then in 2008 to just over $500 million.

Currently ExxonMobil (after the merger in 1999 of Standard Oil Co. and Exxon) is the world’s 10th largest company by revenue. And yet ExxonMobil is still fighting the claims.

This is why thousand of British Columbians are against the Kinder Morgan (KM) oil pipeline; we don’t stand any chance against the big corporations which want to exploit our land, our clean water and our clean air.

Our province is not for you Prime Minister Trudeau to experiment with our B.C. pristine environment; our greatest resource, by approving the KM pipeline (far from your native Ottawa) for the so called national interest.

When the new KM oil pipeline is built oil traffic in Vancouver Harbour will increase from five tankers per month to 34, (almost 700 per cent increase).

With that much traffic increase the question is not if the oil spill occurs, but when? It’s Statistics 101.

Consider this, once the oil is loaded onto tankers, Kinder Morgan’s liability ends.

Any oil spill would mean going after internationally-registered shipping firms which would be almost impossible to attain with lengthy litigation dragging indefinitely. Many of plaintiffs of Exxon settlement have not been paid yet, 25 years after the spill!

Consequently we, the taxpayers would be left to pay for the cleanup of the spill.

I hold a degree in exploratory geology (natural resources) and I used to work in Calgary for big gas and oil companies.

Corporations have one main priority – to make their shareholders lots of money, and the easiest way to realize this is to make some shortcuts on maintenance and safety.

Any oil spill will represent a tragedy and have a catastrophic impact to our environment, tourism and fishing industries as well as to any spin-off jobs of these industries, on our West Coast.

Please Mr. Trudeau, re-consider your decision for the sake of the future of this great country.

Ann Parker,

Langley, BC

Just Posted

Opportunities abound at Black Press Extreme Education and Career Fair

‘We contact companies that we know are either looking to hire’

Letter: Langley Township could be truly innovative in Williams neighbourhood

A local letter writer calls on local government to plan for the future.

Looking Back: The potato club shuts down!

Our community’s history through the files of the Langley Advance

Our View: Shopping mix in Langley tough

As Langley grows, we need to consider what kind of commercial development we want.

VIDEO: Take a tour of the new $55.2-million Salish Secondary in North Clayton

Hundreds came out for the public open house on Wednesday night

Canadian musician duets with ancestral Indigenous voices on debut album

Toronto’s Jeremy Dutcher has mixed his operatic tenor with his Wolastoq First Nation roots

WATCH: Oldest longhouse in the Fraser Valley to be rebuilt in Chilliwack

Longhouse fundraising gala at Tzeachten Hall, May 5 puts spotlight on Indigenous art

COLUMN: Stanley Cup playoff second-round predictions

Sidney Crosby and the Penguins continue their quest for their third straight Stanley Cup

B.C. seeks court ruling on new pipeline regulations

Province wants to require permits for any new bitumen transport

LIVE: TSB findings on plane crash that killed former Alberta Premier Jim Prentice

The TSB will announce its findings and the Capital News will follow.

Former child watchdog to head UBC centre on residential schools

Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond to lead university’s Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre

Man dead after possible attack near Vancouver casino

A 38-year-old man with ‘serious injures’ was rushed to hospital but died in surgery

5 to start your day

3-alarm fire guts East Vancouver print shop, prison escapee back in custody and more

Toronto sports fans come together in wake of van attack

Police probe Toronto van attack as details emerge

Most Read