LETTER: Rainbow flags don’t promote safe places

A Chilliwack woman speaks out against the new Safe Place program rolled out in Langley this week.

Dear Editor,

Saying ‘no’ to the rainbow flag is not saying ‘no’ to the LGBTQ.

It is quite clear why the LGBTQ community is promoting the rainbow flag wherever they can [Parents, police want to create Safe Places for LGBTQ people in Langley, March 8, Langley Advance], but I am confused why other businesses and community members seem to think this is a good idea.

What message are you really sending?

The rainbow flag on your door or window does not say to the homeless, come and sleep on my porch because you are safe here.

It does not say this is a safe place to inject street drugs.

It does not say come and smoke, or drink or hang out in my store.

It does not say there will be no swearing or name calling of ethnic, indigenous, or religious communities.

It does not say that here you are free to think as you choose or act in accordance with your thoughts.

In truth all of those things are taken care of in accordance with bylaws, charities, charters and kind-hearted people. In fact, that is the real reason people put up the rainbow. These kind-hearted people think they are just being kind.

What the gay flag is really telling the world is that you and/or your business are okay with little girls feeling unsafe in gender neutral bathrooms.

It says that HIV can be controlled with medication, and pornography doesn’t feed addiction and violence.

It says to children they can pick from 117+ genders based on “feelings.”

And gender dysphoria does not need mental health support because you can stop suicide with tolerance and improve mental illness with friends.

It says it is not important for every child to have a mom and dad, and in fact using the words mom and dad are insensitive to the LGBTQ.

It says some people deserve more support than others.

It says some people are right and some people are wrong, and if you don’t have the rainbow on your door you are wrong.

And most important it says you are part of this political movement.

Do you want to stand with the children and young people who are being marginalized because of this movement?

What message do you want to send?

Sandra Devenney, Chilliwack

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