Cyclist is forced to the outside to the lane closest to the passing motorist in order to provide safe passing space to the pickup truck which almost on the line. Because of the canopy on the truck, there is no way of knowing whether there is a driver in the vehicle who may suddenly open the drivers side door and into your space. Inexperience or untrained cyclists will not even have the presence of mind to think of checking to see if vehicle is occupied. So you ride the left side of the bike lane which reduces your safe space and closer than the recommended 1 meter passing distance for traffic. (John Evanochko photo)

LETTER: Langley bike lanes still too dangerous for young cyclists

Cyclists, motorists, and pedestrians can co-exist with the right infrastructure and education.

Dear Editor,

A reader recently penned a letter to the editor in a local paper with the warranted complaint that “young” cyclists riding on sidewalks threaten pedestrians with their unruly behaviour.

And why are they not using the bike lanes so generously provided?

While riding on a sidewalk in the Township is permitted unless otherwise posted to the contrary, riding without due care and attention to the safety of the pedestrians is indefensible.

A current bylaw requires cyclists to ride no faster than seven kilometres per hour while on the sidewalk, yielding to pedestrians and announcing their presence to pedestrians.

To expect young, inexperienced cyclists to ride in what is essentially traffic, what with the location of the bike-lanes adjacent to traffic lanes, is not warranted.

What begs the question is why are the lanes outside the parking spaces, which are up against the curb or sidewalk? Why are parked vehicles being protected from traffic with a cycle lane buffer while the vulnerable cyclist is exposed to vehicular traffic?

To those who disagree, I suggest you walk a block or two in a bike lane, with your back to the high-speed traffic whizzing by, often within a metre or less of your left elbow; wide-bodied vehicle’s driver-side mirrors and sometimes trailer impinging upon the bike lane; having to watch for and avoid being “doored” by drivers suddenly opening their doors without checking for cyclist in the lane; realizing that distracted driving is on the increase and see how quickly you get back on the sidewalk.

This is part of the mid-set of the young, inexperienced cyclist, often accompanied by parental advise not to ride in traffic.

Even hard core, experienced cyclist try to avoid this kind of environment – which continues to be built because it it is the cheapest way of supplying bike lanes.

With the Township providing a paltry $80,000 per year for bike infrastructure, in order to provide anything meaningful, the traffic engineering department combines this funding with motor vehicular traffic improvement projects, which ends up being the exact kind of infrastructure that young and older cyclists avoid.

Perhaps with the Township exploring community amenity contributions from windfall development, the funding coffers will grow, with some of it being directed towards building safe bicycle infrastructure – which the “young” cyclists will use, returning sidewalks to pedestrians and the really young cyclists.

It wouldn’t hurt either if funding was made available to local cycling advocacy groups to offer traffic safety training to these same young cyclists who wish to engage in this healthy recreational pursuit.

Cyclists, motorists, and pedestrians can co-exist with the right infrastructure, supplemented with education and a community will to make it happen.

John Evanochko, Murrayville

PS: I provide a few photos showing what some of the issues are with the lanes being located between parked vehicles and traffic, when they really should be safely segregated from traffic, at minimum by being placed between the parked vehicles and the curb/sidewalk. If you are not a cyclist and have not seen these scenarios, I provide a brief explanation as to what is going on here.

 

First, the shaded rear window prevents cyclist from seeing whether there is a driver in the vehicle and therefore a possibility that the door may suddenly be opened into the cyclists lane. Here it happens. Imagine what the scenario would be if the driver did not look in the mirror to see if the bike lane was clear, there was a vehicle passing a cyclist, regardless of the experience level, at the same time the door was being opened in close proximity to the cyclist, who had to react quickly. Whatever the reaction, the outcome will not be pleasant for the cyclist. (John Evanochko photo)

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