Letter: Elegant rule of law challenged over Coulter Berry in Fort Langley

Dear Editor,

There is an elegance to The Rule of Law that lies in its simplicity. The Rule of Law means that no one is above the law: no individual, no bureaucrat, no government at any level.

If asked, most of us would describe ourselves as law-abiding citizens. We were raised as such and have raised or are raising our children within the same moral framework that had served our parents before us.

What has been missed by some, with respect to the Fort Langley issue, is that The Rule of Law has been challenged.

That should be of import to each and every person living in our Township, but that has not been the case.

In fact, in Fort Langley, those who drew attention to the fact in court have been challenged, castigated.

There is a disconnect here.

The guardians of The Rule of Law are the court and the judiciary which stand in defense of the law.

The Township was taken to court to protect The Rule of Law. The Township lost, because it broke the Law.

Laws can be changed, but cannot be ignored. Each of us should question any venue where an existing law is ignored and then, when challenged, is changed after the fact. That is equivalent to raising the speed limit after the rich man has sped through.

Are we continuing to abuse The Rule of Law here in the Township?

How would one explain this issue to one’s children? How do we, as adults, imbue our young people with moral values and the importance of abiding by the law, when those elected to public office fail to set a worthy example?

Our attention must focus, with clarity and without emotion upon this very basic issue.

Our society is governed by laws that serve to strengthen the framework of our social structure. The laws exist, and we do not get to pick and to choose which we will acknowledge and obey.

Our elected municipal officials are held – or should be held – to a higher standard. That high standard also applies to the municipal bureaucrats and employees who draw their pay cheques from the public purse.

The standard exists, and so do the public expectations.

Because of decisions made by Township council and bureaucrats, how many other Langley taxpayers are being, have been, or will be forced to seek redress through the court when comparable existing laws are disregarded in support of, for example, developers?

How many of our hard-earned tax dollars are being, have been, or will be spent on well-paid municipal lawyers fighting against municipal taxpayers?

Now, there is a question to be asked and to be answered before the next election.

I. McKaig, Langley

Just Posted

WIN: Langley thespian stars in upcoming ‘psychological thriller’

Langley’s Andrew Wood plays the role of Lieutenant Walker in Night Watch.

Make-A-Wish BC grants Langley girl’s wish

Mae Ten Haaf battled a brain tumour much of her young life, and recently returned from Disney World.

Mark Warawa won’t run in the next election

Langley MP issues a statement about his impending retirement from politics.

Giants defenceman Bowen Byram named WHL On the Run Player of the Week

Registered three goals and three assists in a pair of victories for Langley-based team

British wheels have a certain appeal

Langley Area Mostly British Motoring Club celebrates English auto design

VIDEO: Car flies across median, flips over edge of Brunette overpass

Dash cam footage shows a vehicle speeding across a Lower Mainland overpass

Surrey needs 350 more cops, activist tells council

‘Right now we are 350 police behind what our population requires,’ politicians are told

Indigenous energy summit includes session on pipeline ownership options

Steven Saddleback of the Indian Resource Council says a session will feature presentations on financing models

Japanese grand champion Kisenosato retires from sumo

The 32-year-old Kisenosato was the first Japanese-born wrestler in 19 years to gain promotion to sumo’s highest rank

UPDATE: Accused B.C. high school killer found fit to stand trial

Gabriel Klein is accused in the 2016 stabbing death of Letisha Reimer at Abbotsford Senior Secondary

Right-wing, neo-Nazi, white supremacist groups an increasing concern: Goodale

Ten people died in April 2018 when Alek Minassian allegedly drove a rental van down the busy stretch in Toronto

Where mattresses go to die

Mattress Recycling opens the largest of its kind mattress-recycling facility in Hope

Canadian stock exchanges to conduct lottery for ‘POT’ ticker amid high demand

The symbol became available after fertilizer Potash Corp. officially merged with Agrium Inc. in early 2018

Most Read