Letter: Blissful days in Walnut Grove a thing of the past

Life is already too fast-paced in Walnut Grove, opines Marilyn Walper, who worries that the new interchange will only make things worse.

Dear Editor,

My husband and I moved to Walnut Grove over 30 years ago.

We raised our two kids here – they attended school at Alex Hope and Walnut Grove Secondary, they played both soccer and softball with the local organizations, and they created many lasting friendships and memories here.

We are a community, and we look after each other.

While our kids were growing up, we never had to worry for their safety walking to and from school or to a friend’s house, because we always knew someone was looking out for them.

Any given day, you could take the kids out to feed the horses and cows that were in the neighbourhood.

This was what drew us to Walnut Grove: it is where the country meets city.

And what more could a young family ask for?

Walnut Grove used to be primarily made up of many young families, but now we have a new generation of Walnut Grovers.

Life has become very busy, we rush here and rush there, and sometimes we forget to stop and smell the roses.

By putting in the 216th interchange to save two minutes in a day, is it really worth it?

I don’t think people realize the impact it will have on our community.

Gone will be the days of feeding  the horses in the neighbourhood, or taking quiet and safe bike rides with the kids.

You will see 216th turn into one big idling parking lot, with new lights lining up and down the street.

The sweet smell of barbecue steak and exhaust, yum.

People from outside our community will not know where our playgrounds are or where our children may play.

It will become road rage, racing to get in front of that one car to arrive home two minutes faster.

Criminals always look for an easy access, a nice direct route in and out and we are serving it to them on a silver platter.

Are we willing to sacrifice the health and safety of our families for shedding two minutes off our commute time?

If you love the smell of exhaust, the continuous sound of cars, then maybe you should consider moving to the city.

“All change is not growth, as all movement is not forward.”

Marilyn Walper, Walnut Grove

Just Posted

Odd Thouts: Tulips keep the news at bay

Time in the garden always offers perspective.

Trappers back to peak form

Langley Junior B Team aims for playoffs

WIN: Langley thespian stars in upcoming ‘psychological thriller’

Langley’s Andrew Wood plays the role of Lieutenant Walker in Night Watch.

Make-A-Wish BC grants Langley girl’s wish

Mae Ten Haaf battled a brain tumour much of her young life, and recently returned from Disney World.

Vandals trash new washrooms in Langley City park

Less than two weeks after the Penzer Park facility opened, it had to be closed

Giant rotating ice disk forms in Maine river

Ice disk that is roughly 100 yards wide has formed in the Presumpscot River

5 to start your day

Gabriel Klein fit to stand trial, Gillette ad stirs online uproar and more

Razor burn: Gillette ad stirs online uproar

A Gillette ad for men invoking the #MeToo movement is sparking intense online backlash

B.C. teacher reprimanded after telling kids about deaths, Pickton murders

Tracy Joseph Fairley resigned from Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows district April 23, 2018

Feds poised to bolster RCMP accountability with external committee

Long-anticipated move is the latest attempt at rebuilding the force following years of sagging morale

Canada needs a digital ID system, bankers association says

The Department of Finance last week officially launched its public consultation on the merits of open banking

Surrey needs 350 more cops, activist tells council

‘Right now we are 350 police behind what our population requires,’ politicians are told

Indigenous energy summit includes session on pipeline ownership options

Steven Saddleback of the Indian Resource Council says a session will feature presentations on financing models

Japanese grand champion Kisenosato retires from sumo

The 32-year-old Kisenosato was the first Japanese-born wrestler in 19 years to gain promotion to sumo’s highest rank

Most Read