A goat was carried out of a house in the 5500 block of 216th Street by SPCA investigators Monday afternoon.

UPDATED: Langley SPCA raid seizes cats, goats, chickens

Dozens of animals have been seized from a Langley home.

The BC SPCA seized 88 animals, including dogs, cats, and farm animals from a former farm in Langley.

In total, 45 dogs, 18 cats, 24 farm animals including goats, chickens, and ducks, and a turtle were removed from the home in the 5500 block of 216th Street Monday, said SPCA chief enforcement officer Marcie Moriarty.

Three dead animals were found on the property, and one of the dogs was in critical distress when found. It has since been euthanized, after speaking to its owner’s veterinarian

“We received a complaint about animals in distress on this property and obtained a warrant to view the animals,” said Moriarty.

The 88 animals removed met the definition of distress under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, Moriarty said.

A goat was carried out and loaded into a van, and officers used pet carriers to remove roosters and chickens, ducks, pigeons, a pot bellied pig, and cats.

The animals are thought to be suffering from malnutrition, emaciation, and severe dental disease, said Moriarty.

She said the home was not a puppy or cat breeding mill.

The caregiver for the animals is Sandra Simans, founder of 1atatime Rescue.

“We’ve spent tens of thousands of dollars on our animals (and) we’re not neglecting them,” Simans told the Vancouver Sun. “That’s not our mandate.

“I think there’s a bit of bad blood [with the BCSPCA] and it [the seizure] was heavy-handed.”

In 2012, the SPCA seized 52 dogs and 19 cats from Simans’ Burnaby residence. Some of the animals were adopted out, but others were returned to Simans after she moved to Surrey.

Simans sued the SPCA. A judge found the seizure of the animals was justified, but awarded Simans $2,500 in damages for defamation, for a statement by SPCA officials implying she had caused harm to one dog, which she had been caring for after it came to her with a broken jaw.

“Part of being a responsible rescue group is to take in the number of animals you can adequately care for,” said Moriarty. “If an individual or group becomes overwhelmed the BC SPCA is always here to help. But it is not acceptable to take in animals and allow them to continue suffering without proper nutrition, housing or veterinary care.”

The cats and dogs seized this week were taken to the BC SPCA shelters in Vancouver and Surrey.

The site did not have a business license and under its current zoning, is not eligible for a kennel license.

– with files from the Vancouver Sun

Just Posted

Giants serve up major defeat to Pats at Langley Events Centre

On the ice, Vancouver G-Men wrap up home stand with a 10-4 win over Regina Friday night.

Outdoor terrace opens at Langley City hall

The outdoor terrace renovation is the final component of the Timms Community Centre renewal.

A GoFundMe for the goats

Matthew Farden surpassed his fundraising goal for Aldergrove’s Happy Herd Farm rescue animals.

Langley Township’s Froese named vice-chair of Mayors’ Council

The Township mayor will be one of the top officials overseeing TransLink.

LETTER: Canada should not be selling weapons abroad

A Langley man is critical of Canada for selling arms that are being used to kill civilians.

Winter weather hits parts of Canada

As some parts of the country brace for cold, parts of B.C. remain warmer than 10 C

B.C. teacher’s Amazing Race takes students on Canada-wide adventure

Agassiz high school students say they had the experience of a life time

Don’t sign USMCA until LGBTQ language excised, U.S. lawmakers urge Trump

The trade agreement, forged after 13 months of tense negotiations between Canada and the U.S. is scheduled for Nov. 30

US official: US intel says prince ordered Khashoggi killing

Vice-President Mike Pence told reporters that ‘the murder of Jamal Khashoggi was an atrocity.’

Canada’s health system commendable overall but barriers to care remain: UN

The United Nations says Canada’s health care system is “commendable” overall but vulnerable groups still face barriers to quality care.

Unique technology gives children with special needs more independent play

UVic’s CanAssist refined seven prototypes aided by $1.5M government contribution

Kelly Ellard’s boyfriend has statutory release revoked

Darwin Duane Dorozan had several parole infractions that found him ‘unmanageable’

New chair of Metro Vancouver board is Burnaby councillor

The 40-person board is made up of elected officials from 21 cities and one First Nation

Most Read