Serena Oh, center, at a debate during the 2016 Langley City byelection. (Langley Advance files)

UPDATED: Byelection lawsuit cost Langley City $27,000

Last-place candidate Serena Oh failed to convince the Supreme Court to hear her case.

Serena Oh’s failed attempt to challenge a Langley City byelection has cost the municipality approximately $27,000.

The Supreme Court of Canada recently declined to hear Oh’s appeal. The City had argued that that Oh’s complaint had no validity.

Oh was one of the defeated candidates in the February, 2016 byelection for a City council seat. Oh had the lowest number of votes out of all nine candidates, with 57 votes. Nathan Pachal, who won the council seat, received 740 of the 2,074 votes cast.

Nevertheless, Oh insisted that she should have won, claiming that she believed at least 1,500 people were planning to vote for her.

Oh represented herself, pushing her challenge through the B.C. Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal before attempting to take it to the top court in the country.

“Most judges, they don’t actually know the law, I find,” Oh told the Langley Advance in 2016 as she began her legal challenge.

READ MORE: Oh byelection claim goes to court

Oh missed the deadline for a judicial recount of the vote.

She claimed that she had support from numerous locals, and said last year that she was gathering signatures from people who claimed to have voted for her.

However, her attempts to overturn the vote were repeatedly rebuffed by judges, who ruled that there was a lack of any evidence of wrongdoing during the election.

“It is difficult to understand where the information is coming from, how Ms. Oh is reaching the conclusions which it appears she has reached by looking at some sort of documentation,” wrote Justice Brenda Brown in her B.C. Supreme Court ruling dismissing the claim. “It is just not possible to determine what the basis of the evidence is.”

Despite the lack of evidence, the case has cost Langley City financially.

At the B.C. Supreme Court, lawyers for the City submitted a draft bill of costs totalling $2,904.40. Brown ordered Oh to pay a lump sum of $2,000.

City administrator Francis Cheung said the City looked into recovering their court costs from Oh. Unfortunately, their lawyers advised that going through that process could actually cost as much – or more – than the money the City could recover. The City council has decided not to seek cost recovery.

Oh managed to pursue her claim despite having been declared a vexatious litigant. In 2012, a judge issued an order that Oh would not be allowed to launch legal actions without the permission of the court. Another, similar order was issued later regarding a lawyer Oh had sued.

A vexatious litigant is someone who habitually or persistently launches flimsy legal actions. They often represent themselves and tend to repeatedly appeal any rulings.

According to the provincial Ministry of the Attorney General, there is no registry of vexatious litigants.

Just Posted

Rollover crash on Langley’s 200th Street

A two-vehicle collision flipped one car.

VIDEO: Langley BMX racers propel pumpkins down their track

Once the standard race day was over, riders let a series of gourds roll down their Brookswood track.

Fort Langley wakes up to a flower bombing

A team from a village floral shop wanted to do a beautification project.

Six-month wait for marijuana retail in Langley Township

Councils in City and Township have not yet drafted retail pot rules.

B.C. sailor surprised by humpback whale playing under her boat

Jodi Klahm-Kozicki said the experience was ‘magical’ near Denman Island

Trump vilifies caravan, says he’ll cut Central American aid

Despite Mexican efforts to stop them at the Guatemala-Mexico border, about 5,000 Central American migrants resumed their advance toward the U.S. border Sunday in southern Mexico.

Federal carbon tax rebates will exceed the cost for most people affected

Officials say 70 per cent of people in those provinces will get back more than they end up paying out as fuel costs rise to incorporate the carbon tax.

Rotating strike in Toronto will have ‘significant impact,’ says Canada Post

Canada Post union announces rotating strikes in four Canadian cities.

Cancelling Saudi Arabia arms deal would cost $1 billion: Trudeau

Canada has added its voice to global calls for answers, with Trudeau telling the CBC in an interview today that the Saudi government’s explanation of what happened lacks credibility.

5 to start your day

Ultra low-cost flights to Iceland, Abbotsford mom stuck in Africa over adoption delay and more

Former B.C. sheriff caught in sex-related sting pleads guilty to lesser charge

Kevin Johnston will be sentenced on Nov. 6 for his role in communicating online with a person posing as a 14-year-old girl.

Oil spill response exercise happening in Vancouver Harbour

Staff will respond to a simulated 150K litre spill

WWE star Roman Reigns announces he has leukemia

Grappler formerly played in CFL

Most Read