A Supreme Court of B.C. judge in Prince Rupert deemed a homeless man a vexatious litigant in April after claiming he owns all the land in the province.

Self-proclaimed Christ named vexatious litigant in B.C.

City of Prince Rupert dishes out $46K to fight frivolous lawsuits; Gitanmaax also has legal history.

For the past 22 years, a homeless man, who has self-identified as Christ, Chief Kitsilano and owner of all the land in the province, has been filing lawsuits from Vancouver to Prince Rupert, until this April, when a Supreme Court of B.C. judge deemed him a vexatious litigant.

In the legal system, if someone has a history of initiating court actions that obviously wouldn’t succeed with the purpose to annoy the defendant(s), then the judge may declare that individual a “vexatious litigant” and they would need permission from the court to pursue another lawsuit in the future.

In the case Sterritt v. Canada, “God, Prince Kitsilano, Skidegate” James Sterritt filed a lawsuit on behalf of all Indigenous Peoples and Muslims against The Queen of Canada, and the province of British Columbia, the City of Prince Rupert and M’Akola Group of Societies.

Last summer and fall, 74-year-old James Sterritt was often seen riding his bike throughout the city with his three unleashed dogs trailing close behind.

When the dogs were seized by the city bylaw officer, Sterritt first disputed the bylaw ticket and then he filed a lawsuit on Oct. 3 against the City of Prince Rupert, Premier Christy Clark, the prime minister and Her Majesty the Queen claiming they had no jurisdiction over him “as paramount owner of the private right belonging to all Indians by natural law, in all land in the Province of British Columbia.”

While Sterritt represented himself, the city flew in a lawyer from the Vancouver law firm Valkyrie Law corp. The total cost of the legal proceedings for the city — and taxpayers — totalled $46,214.

“I’m fighting for what I’m entitled to,” Sterritt said on July 6. “My argument and positions I take are all jurisdictional. The Indians own the land.”

When Justice Robert Punnett offered his reasons for judgment on April 27 at the Prince Rupert Courthouse, he stated “there is a noted lack of connection to reality and the assertions made are absurd.”

In order to declare Sterritt a vexatious litigant, Punnett stated that the court must look at the whole history of the matter.

Sterritt has made similar divine and aboriginal land claims dating back to 1995 in federal court, and again in 2002 against the City of Prince Rupert. In 2010, he filed against the RCMP and the Gitanmaax Indian Band in Terrace. But then, the Gitanmaax Indian Band, filed a claim against Sterritt for setting up camp and trespassing on reserve property in 2012. In December 2016, Sterritt filed a notice of claim against the Gitanmaax in the Smithers Registry, as well as the Queen, Canada and the RCMP, claiming right of possession of land.

When Sterritt set up a tent on Lotbiniere Street in Prince Rupert last October, he said he had lived in many tent cities and expected to go to court over the issue as he had done before. A couple days after making that statement, he sent an email to the newsroom with the subject line “Indian refuses to be removed from Indian Land.” In the email, he explained that a gale had destroyed the camp, and he had moved into a motor home on the same street.

“We tried to tell you that we are not here homeless per se’ but are deliberately claiming rights in the land under the city as Indian Land on which the city imposed itself without our consent and we intend to be resolved as the paramount owners of the land and convert it into ‘Land reserved for Indians’ and govern it as a reserve under the Federal Indian Act,” Sterritt wrote.

“We are presently resisting efforts to remove us and anticipate arguing our claim in court before we agree to relocate.” Sterritt brought his claim to court, represented himself and lost.

In 2002, Sterritt v. Prince Rupert the judge had dismissed his claims as being frivolous or vexatious. It wasn’t until five years later that Sterritt was declared a vexatious litigant, and he is no longer allowed to continue suing corporations, municipalities or people without the court’s permission.

“The courts in Canada ‘have finite resources that cannot be squandered. Every moment devoted to a vexatious litigant is a moment unavailable to a deserving litigant’,” Justice Punnett stated in his judgment citing Canada v. Olumide, 2017.

However, the Prince Rupert Courthouse hasn’t seen the last of Sterritt. After spending the winter in Hazelton, Sterritt is back in the city for more court proceedings, with his next court date scheduled for July 20.

Just Posted

KPU campuses go smoke-free starting Jan. 21 – and that includes vaping

‘We didn’t make this decision lightly’ says prez of the Surrey-based institution

Trial begins for man charged with 2010 murder of Mandy Johnson

Langley single mom was fatally shot while in vehicle in Abbotsford

Sick, or not, Langley’s Tyler Tardi wouldn’t miss national competition

A Langley-based junior curling team is defending the national title, despite an ailing skip.

Garage sale brings out some unusual characters such as Langley’s Holly Zonneveld

A gaggle of comedic individuals unite in Surrey Little Theatre’s latest production.

Novice swimmers back in the water in Langley Saturday

Seven Langley Olympians Swim Club members made a strong showing at a seniors circuit meet Saturday.

VIDEO: New museums, community centre, condos proposed for Fort Langley

A new Township proposal is expected to go public this week.

Bank of Canada hikes interest rate to 1.25%, cites strong economic data

The rate increase is expected to prompt Canada’s large banks to raise their prime lending rates

5 to start your day

BC Liberals staffer in court for ethnic vote scandal, friends mourn boy killed in Vancouver and more

Trump aces mental aptitude test designed by Canadian immigrant

“This is a good example, I think, that will be helpful to change views about immigration. And maybe for Mr. Trump himself to consider immigrants as contributors to advancing science, advancing our societies.”

Rival Koreas agree to form first unified Olympic team

The rival Koreas took major steps toward reducing their bitter animosity

Canada, U.S. lead call for sanctions against North Korea

Foreign ministers from 20 countries are meeting in Vancouver to discuss security and stability on the Korean Peninsula

Federal NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh announces engagement

Federal NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh engaged to clothing designer Gurkiran Kaur

Hijab-cutting case highlights ethical issues with putting kids in spotlight

A Toronto police investigation has concluded a girl’s hijab was not cut by a scissors-wielding man as she walked to school

Change in politics, society on sexual misconduct ‘not fast enough,’ says Trudeau

Trudeau says society still lagging behind the systemic changes he is trying to make when it comes to preventing and responding to sexual harassment

Most Read