Steps are being taken to ensure rinks are inclusive following a BC Hockey investigation into the alleged use of a racial slur by a Salmon Arm player during a Feb. 23 Bantam Tier 3 game in Sicamous. (File photo)

Racial slur at B.C. rink sparks educational program for minor hockey associations

BC Hockey investigation unable to verify use of racist comment by Salmon Arm player

B.C. minor hockey associations will be taking steps to ensure hockey rinks are safe and inclusive.

The move follows a BC Hockey investigation into the alleged use of a racial slur by a Salmon Arm player directed at a Kamloops player during a Feb. 23 Bantam Tier 3 playoff game in Sicamous.

A written statement received Tuesday from BC Hockey CEO Barry Petrachenko states education packages will be made available prior to the 2018/19 season targeted at parents, players, officials and administrators.

“Our findings, while inconclusive, do not indicate that the allegation is false,” says Petrachenko. “We are simply unable to ascertain which player allegedly made the remark. This is an issue BC Hockey takes very seriously and it is felt that further education on the issue will be of benefit to our participants.”

RELATED: Minor hockey investigates after N-word allegedly used on Sicamous ice

While unhappy with the findings, Sandy Horner, mother of the Kamloops player, Ty, said her intent in speaking publicly about the incident wasn’t to punish, but to educate and raise awareness of racism in the sport.

“I am more than happy, and there are other parents of minority kids who are more than happy, to help them create something like that,” said Horner.

In his statement, Petrachenko explains the investigation process included interviews by the presidents of the Kamloops Minor Hockey Association and the Salmon Arm Minor Hockey Association and, according to their reports, neither organization was able to “identify any coach or any other player on the ice who heard the alleged remark.

“During the game, when the officials were made aware of the alleged slur, they asked the Kamloops bench to identify the player from the opposing team who was alleged to have uttered the slur and a player was not able to be identified at that time,” says Petrachenko. “The official approached the Salmon Arm team to relay the allegation. At that point, the Salmon Arm coach confronted his team, asking who/if anyone made the remark. No player came forward.”

Horner said it was not her son, but a teammate who heard a Salmon Arm player use the “n-word” and reported it to the Kamloops coach.

“Neither of the boys were asked about what went on other than the official asking my son to identify the player and my son did identify the player and actually both boys told who it was…,” said Horner of the investigation.

Regardless, Horner believes speaking up about the incident has raised awareness among the minor hockey community.

“A lot of people have said to me, I didn’t know that this still happens in 2018,” said Horner. “Here, let’s make it even more controversial, I say… that’s your white advantage that you can think that doesn’t happen in 2018, and their eyes have been opened to it. And that was our whole point in going public, to open eyes and educate.”

Following the incident, Horner said her son’s team made it to game three of the championships and he is now into spring hockey and had a fantastic opening tournament.

“They brought home gold in the Kamloops tournament and they’re off to Calgary in two weekends,” said Horner.


@SalmonArm
lachlan@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

VIDEO: Saturday was devoted to the arts in Langley City

The 25th annual Arts Alive festival took over a main thoroughfare.

Arena opens at Aldergrove Credit Union Community Centre

Grand procession brings Aldergrove ice arena users to new facility

Regional fuchsia and geranium club firmly rooted in Langley

The club’s annual show and competition Saturday filled St. Andrew’s Anglican Church with colour.

‘Beauty amongst such tragedy:’ B.C. photographer captures nature’s trifecta

David Luggi’s photo from a beach in Fraser Lake shows Shovel Lake wildfire, Big Dipper and an aurora

Air quality advisory continues in the Lower Mainland

Smoke from Interior fires brings fine particulate

‘We will not forget:’ Thousands attend funeral fallen Fredericton officers

Hundreds of officials marched in the parade, which included massed band, several police motorcycles

B.C. man designer behind Canucks’ retro jersey

Jeremie White was 20 years old when he told Canucks assistant GM Brian Burke he had a design

Lions give up late TD in 24-23 loss to Argos

B.C. falls to 3-5, fumbling away last-minute chance in Toronto

Eagle tree cut down legally a 1st for B.C. city

Planned eagle preserve ‘a first for City of Surrey’

Smoky skies like a disappearing act for sights, monuments around B.C.

Haze expected to last the next several days, Environment Canada said

Canadians react to death of former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan at age 80

Nobel Peace Prize-winning former UN leader died early Saturday following a short illness

44 drownings so far this year in B.C.

Lifesaving Society urging caution to prevent deaths while on lakes, oceans and in pools

Some of B.C.’s air quality levels worse than Jodhpur, India

Okanagan, northern B.C. seeing some of the worst air quality globally

Most Read