Q9: 20 Questions for Langley Township Council candidates

Rick Green (for MAYOR) – There is no question that there is a need and every municipality should do it’s share. I believe a decision such as this can only come after serious due diligence is undertaken. What are best practices, what funds are available for partnership? 

Petrina Arnason – YES  The TOL “Housing Action Plan” has identified the need for the Township to work in collaboration with other partners in order to ensure the adequate provision of “affordable” housing options.  The onus for the provision of more “price sensitive” housing cannot be solely downloaded onto developers but must be shared by local government and other agencies in order to ensure fairness with respect to the distribution of this “subsidy” to a number of partners. Initiatives such as waiving DCC’s by local government or up-zoning for the provision of higher density in return for affordable units are some of the mechanisms that have been successful in other communities. 

 

Solon Bucholz – YES, with 10% of our residents considered to be low income, there is a clear need to support this initiative to ensure a balanced community that supports all of its residents.

David Davis – I don’t know. We would have to investigate it.

Bev Dornan – If you mean affordable housing, I think that this is being done, but if you mean subsidized housing, that is something we need to work with the Provincial government on.

Charlie Fox – Yes, We have a ‘Housing Action Plan’ which is a template for both planning purposes and provides a guide for Council decision making. Housing types and styles should be determined by market demand and if there is a need for more low-income housing that will be provided. 

Clint Lee – Yes, we need to be more socially responsible.

Patricia Lessard – NO, I don’t believe we need one for the entire Township.  I believe when creating Official Community Plans that a certain percentage of trees should have to remain. 

Jackie Mandzak – Yes. We talk about affordability and how increasing density will assist with housing affordability.  The reality is that in Metro Vancouver, affordable housing is an oxymoron.  Many people are priced out of the market in both owning and rentals by virtue of the fact we are an expensive place in the country to live. There are young families and people on fixed incomes that cannot afford a home. The building of more and more developments for home owners is not the answer. There should be a requirement for low-income housing so that people of all income levels can have a safe and affordable place to live. 

Kevin Mitchell – YES, but with the proviso that developers respond primarily to market demand and return on investment.  The business case for low income housing must be made so the development community is not “penalized” but is rewarded or incentivized for creating this much needed resource.

Scott Nichols – Safe, secure and affordable housing is important, particularly for our aging community and those with disabilities. The number of people 65 and over is growing dramatically. With low-income housing, however, often comes a stereotypical association with drugs, crime and violence. 

Kim Richter – YES. Our population is rapidly aging and our young residents need more affordable housing options to keep them in the community. Integration of low-income housing into all developments creates more balanced neighbourhoods and sustainable long term development.

Michelle Sparrow – Yes. We need to ensure our community accommodates the demand for low-income housing and to ensure we have a wide range of housing options.

Dave Stark – Yes. Developers need to be asked by council to make Community Amenity Contributions (CAC’s) like most other municipalities. These funds go towards supporting the people/social side of development. Typically, they will be “new” dollars that help fund, schools, recreation, fire services, libraries, and some accessible housing.

Blair Whitmarsh – No – cannot require developers to build a certain style of housing.

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