Q11: 20 Questions for Langley Township Council candidates

Rick Green (for MAYOR) – This consideration must be broached through a NEW Community Based Planning Model that is developed through Community Collaboration. It is essential the community plays an integral part in that decision. 

Petrina Arnason – NO I feel that the current plan to include high-rises in the Gateway area (200th Street corridor) will provide sufficient density to support public transit and that the density levels in Willoughby should not be increased.

David Davis – No. At this point the current infrastructure is not ready for high density.

Bev Dornan – Yes. This is the area that would be the most appropriate and it is near the transit park and ride and will be on the fast  bus lanes as the transit improvements as developed in the future

Charlie Fox – No, certainly not in the areas being developed at present. Possible close to the freeway exchange at 200th in the Carvolth Neighvourhood Plan but that is all.

Mel Kositsky – Yes. It is surprising that there have not been any high rise developments in Langley Township at this point, when Surrey, Abbotsford and even Pitt Meadows have tall buildings. It is a recognition by the development community that Langley is unique and not ready for such type of housing. But there are locations in Willoughby where construction of high rise apartments may be acceptable to the community following proper consultation.

Zoshia Ettenberg – No – not at present. At this point there seem to be so many issues which we need to address before this one.

Clint Lee – No, certain heights may be acceptable in certain locations, but we don’t need to turn Langley into Vancouver.

Jackie Mandzak – No. While I do support density in Willoughby if the OCP is revisited and there are measures in place to ensure that the plan unfolds as it is supposed to do, I do not think that the Township of Langley is the place for high rises. Even if the projections of the township’s population come to fruition, I don’t believe that high rise developments are the answer. If we are to respect the character and history of each community in the township, they do not have a place here.  Well planned low rise developments are a better option.

Kevin Mitchell – NO. Langley is not the west end of Vancouver or parts of Burnaby.  High rises if any should be limited to the Willowbrook mall area as it can support the density and has many of the required services.  I have spoken with the property manager in charge of Willowbrook mall and she has confirmed high rises are part of their revitalization plan.

Scott Nichols – No. Not at this time. The infrastructure is already burdened.

Kim Richter – DON’T KNOW. Much has been said about the need for density to accommodate Metro-Vancouver’s Regional Growth Strategy but no one has ever explained exactly why we need one million more residents in this region over the next 20 years (other than to support the economic engine of the development community). I fear that high rises in Willoughby will do nothing more than create even more parking, school and health care problems mainly because we are not trading density well for green space and livability. If we have to wait for another 10-20 years to get more viable transit in Langley because we are at the bottom of the transit priority list, then I think we are just going to create another 10-20 years of unlivable and poor quality of life problems in the Township. I do not want to see this happen as it does not make for a better future for Langley. We should not have to live through one entire generation in Langley just to get more effective transit. This is a very false economy in my opinion.

Kerri Ross – Yes. With the appropriate planning data, Development Cost Charges (DCC’s) and Amenity Cost Charges (ACC’s) I could be in favour of high rises. We would need greater and adequate consultation with the neighborhood. 

Michelle Sparrow – Yes, but only in the appropriate areas. I also go back to my comments in Question 2, as I believe a Development Phasing Strategy will be key moving forward, especially as we deal with these higher density developments.  

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