The Cowichan SPCA helped to adopt out an entire litter of pigs. (Citizen file)

Owner of potbelly pig says he’s sorry for killing her for food

Molly was adopted from SPCA in January

The owner of Molly, the potbelly pig who was killed and eaten soon after she was adopted from the Cowichan & District branch of the SPCA, said he’s sorry.

Global News reported on Feb. 25 that the Vancouver Island resident, who goes by “Austin Manson Forget”, took to Facebook in a now deleted posting stating that he did not adopt Molly with the intention of killing her.

“It was only when she became aggressive with my partners [sic] dog and had tried breaking through our glass door that I made the decision to have her put down,” he said.

“I understand and invite people to have their own opinions on the matter, but please understand that I am still human. I realize that what I did was wrong, and I cannot fix it, I can only continue to apologize.”

Austin said that since the story went public, he and his partner have faced a number of death threats.

RELATED STORY: ADOPTED PIG KILLED FOR FOOD

He said he believes the fact that he faces no charges for eating Molly is what’s fueling people’s anger.

“I have owned animals throughout my entire life and I have never considered taking any of my pets’ lives,” he said.

“They have all lived healthy and happy lives. I am a huge advocate for standing up against animal abuse. If I could do more, I would, however I am a young adult and I feel that I’m trying to the best of my ability to right my wrongs. If I could pay a fine to make people feel better I would, and I feel like the fact that I was not charged is where a lot of the anger is coming from.”

Molly, a three-year-old Vietnamese potbelly pig, was one of 57 pot-bellied pigs that ended up in the SPCA’s care in May, 2017, after the owner determined he was no longer able to care for them.

Most were successfully adopted out locally, and some were sent to other SPCA branches.

As part of the adoption agreement, Molly’s new owners had agreed not to use the pig for food.

But there is little the SPCA can do in regards to enforcing this part of the agreement.

An official with BC SPCA said last week that because animals are considered property under the law, once an adoption agreement is made, that person is the full legal owner of that animal and the SPCA loses all legal rights to the animal.

The BC SPCA did send constables to the property to investigate the matter and concluded Molly was killed humanely, but Austin is never allowed to adopt again from the SPCA.



robert.barron@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Langley teacher who screamed at, grabbed elementary students suspended

This is the second four-month suspension for the Langley teacher.

Langley Thunder player named WLA Rookie of the Year

Tyler Pace had a great year in his first full season for the Thunder.

Langley What’s On: Aug. 16, 2018 edition

Submit Langley events: LangleyAdvance.com/add-event or news@langleyadvance.com (subject: What’s On).

Serious collision in South Surrey

One to hospital with serious injuries; 16 Avenue remains closed

B.C. declares state of emergency as more than 560 wildfires rage

This is only the fourth state of emergency ever issued during a fire season

Interim GoFundMe payments approved in Humboldt Broncos crash

$50,000 to be given to each of the 13 survivors and each family of the 16 people who died

Altidore nets 3 as Toronto drubs Whitecaps 5-2

Vancouver falls 7-4 on aggregate in Canadian Championship final

Ottawa intervenes to get B.C. ball player, 13, to Little League World Series

Before immigration issue was resolved, Dio Gama was out practicing the game he loves Wednesday

Pet goldfish invades small B.C. lake

Pinecrest Lake is located between Whistler and Squamish

Metro Vancouver water reservoirs in ‘good shape’

Reserves sitting at 70-per-cent full, officials said, despite long stretch without major rain

Mounties deployed to help B.C. communities affected by wildfires

RCMP officers heading to places particularly within central, northern and southern B.C.

Chinese medicine practitioner in B.C. facing historical sex assault charges

71-year old Kit Wong practiced acupuncture from his home during the time of the assaults

Quebec sets aside $900 million for companies hurt by U.S. tariffs

Premier Philippe Couillard says his government will make $863 million available over five years

Most Read