Five homes have been evacuated in British Columbia’s Fraser Valley over concerns about the stability of Bear Mountain after a giant boulder slid down into a residential community last month. Nina Grossman/The Observer

Boulder sparks evacuation order near Harrison Lake

District of Kent mayor says no one was injured but slope stability remains a concern

UPDATED: Several homes have been evacuated near Harrison Lake Sunday after a 50,000-pound boulder came down in early November.

According to District of Kent Mayor John Van Laerhoven, a local state of emergency was declared as a precautionary measure for those residents living on a select number of properties on the east side of Rockwell Drive, north of Thunderbird Creek.

“The rock that’s sitting there isn’t going to hurt anybody. It’s not going to move,” said Van Laerhoven. “We’re just concerned about the slope behind those properties.”

“Life safety is paramount for our citizens living in this area and the evacuation order is an extra precautionary step to address a potentially serious situation with the freezing weather in the higher elevations.”

Van Laerhoven said it wasn’t yet clear how long the evacuation would last but that no one was injured and the only property damage was to a garden shed of a property on Rockwell Drive.

Kent Harrison emergency program coordinator Gerald Basten says District staff are conducting a preliminary assessment and will be working with the province to have geotechnical assessments done on the rock bluffs at Rockwell drive.

“Once the professional engineers go in and have a look we’ll know a lot more,” he says.

The public is asked to limit travels to the area of Rockwell Drive if possible. Information on emergency planning can be found here.

More to come.

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Concerns that another freeze-thaw cycle could loosen rocks on Bear Mountain have led to the evacuation of five homes along Rockwell Drive in the District of Kent.

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