Avian flu found at two more farms in Fraser Valley

Two more Fraser Valley farms and a barn near an already quarantined poultry farm have been added to the list of infected properites.

A total of 155,000 birds are on the infected eight properties.

Culling of birds in infected farms started earlier this month.

On Dec. 8, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) established a primary control zone in the area where the disease has been identified.

The province and the poultry industry support this decision and are working together with the CFIA to implement it.

Avian influenza is highly contagious between birds and can spread rapidly. Because southern British Columbia has a high concentration of poultry operations, the primary control zone covers an area beyond the premises that are currently affected.

The primary control zone is bordered on the west by the Pacific Ocean, on the south by the United States border, on the north by Highway 16, and on the east by the border between British Columbia and Alberta. A map is available on the CFIA website.

The primary control zone is divided into three disease control zones: infected, restricted and security. The three zones represent relative levels of risk and movement restrictions vary accordingly. Most of the restrictions apply to the infected and restricted zones because of the greater potential that the virus can spread.

Within the primary control zone, there are three disease control sub-zones: infected, restricted and security.

* The outer boundary of an infected zone is up to 3 km from any known infected premises.

* The restricted zone is established surrounding the infected zone and measured based on the epidemiology of the disease in order to prevent the spread of avian influenza (3 km to 10 km).

* The security zone is the remainder of the primary control zone (beyond 10 km).

The movement restrictions apply to:

* captive birds (including but not limited to poultry, fowl and pet birds);

* poultry products or by-products;

* anything that has been exposed to captive birds (which could include but is not limited to feed, vehicles, equipment or clothing).

All movement of captive birds in and out of, and through this zone is strictly controlled and requires a permit from the CFIA. The movement restrictions also apply to poultry products and by-products and material that has come into contact with captive birds.

Avian influenza viruses do not pose risks to food safety when poultry and poultry products are properly handled and cooked. Avian influenza rarely affects humans that do not have consistent contact with infected birds. Public health authorities stand ready to take precautionary measures as warranted.

Poultry farmers are urged to take an active role in protecting their flocks by employing strict biosecurity measures on their property, and immediately reporting any suspicious symptoms to the CFIA.

For more information on avian influenza and measures poultry farmers can take to protect their flocks, visit the CFIA web site at inspection.gc.ca.

Just Posted

Tardi earns first victory in quest for third national title

A Langley-based junior curling team is in Prince Albert, Sask. for the Canadian championships.

VIDEO: Giants wrap southern swing with 6-4 win in Spokane

The Langley-based hockey team defeated the Chiefs Friday night.

Charges upgraded against mother of murdered Langley girl

Kerryann Lewis now faces first- rather than second-degree murder in the death of Aaliyah Rosa.

LETTER: Langley/Surrey shortchanged on transit for Vancouver

Funding to get SkyTrain to Langley City could come from not undergrounding Vancouver’s extension.

LETTER: Area letter writer puts Trump government shutdown in perspective

A Maple Ridge letter writer is critical of Hillary Clinton’s comments about the shutdown.

VIDEO: Students in MAGA hats mock Native American at Indigenous Peoples March

Diocese in Kentucky says it is investigating the matter, caught on video by onlookers

CONSUMER REPORT: What to buy each month in 2019 to save money

Resolve to buy all of the things you want and need, but pay less money for them

Want to avoid the speculation tax on your vacant home? Rent it out, Horgan says

Premier John Horgan and Sheila Malcolmson say speculation and vacancy tax addresses homelessness

UPDATE: B.C. woman and boy, 6, found safe, RCMP confirm

Roseanne Supernault says both she and her six-year-old nephew are fine and she has contacted police

PHOTOS: Women’s Marches take to the streets across B.C. and beyond

Women and allies marched worldwide protesting violence against women, calling for equality

Anxiety in Alaska as endless aftershocks rattle residents

Seismologists expect the temblors to continue for months, although the frequency has lessened

Women’s March returns across the U.S. amid shutdown and controversy

The original march in 2017, the day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, drew hundreds of thousands of people

Federal Liberals announce former B.C. MLA as new candidate in byelection

Richard Lee will face off against federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh

No winning ticket in $10 million Lotto Max jackpot

No win in Friday night’s draw means the next Lotto Max draw will be approximately $17 million

Most Read